Twenty two states and the District of Columbia are set to raise their minimum wage in 2017 (see below for the full list).

As a state that leads the country in income inequality between rich and poor, has one of the country’s lowest child welfare rankings and more than 90,000 children who depend on a minimum wage worker, you’d think New Mexico should be on the list of increasing wage states.  But it isn’t for an incredibly frustrating reason.

Even though more than 2/3 of New Mexicans support raising the state’s minimum wage of just $7.50 an hour, Republican leaders in the State House have consistently organized efforts kill those proposals. On the one occasion when a simple $1 increase passed the legislature in 2013, Governor Martinez vetoed it.

But, thanks to progressive wins in State Legislative races in 2016, Democrats see a new opportunity to raise the wage with a new Constitutional Amendment that doesn’t require the governor’s approval.

The minimum wage will rise in a number of states in 2017:

  • Alaska: $9.80
  • Arizona: $10.00
  • Arkansas: $8.50 for employers with 4 or more employees
  • California: $10.50 for employers with 26 or more employees (for smaller employers, the rate remains $10.00)
  • Colorado: $9.30 ($6.28 for tipped employees)
  • Connecticut: $10.10
  • District of Columbia: $12.50, beginning July 1, 2017 ($3.33 for tipped employees)
  • Florida: $8.10 ($5.08 for tipped employees)
  • Hawaii: $9.25
  • Maine: $9.00, beginning January 7, 2017
  • Maryland: $9.25, beginning July 1, 2017
  • Massachusetts: $11.00 ($3.75 for tipped employees)
  • Michigan: $8.90 ($3.38 for tipped employees)
  • Missouri: $7.70 ($3.85 for tipped employees)
  • Montana: $8.15
  • New Jersey: $8.44
  • New York: $9.70, beginning December 31, 2016 ($11.00 for employers in NYC with 11 or more employees; $10.50 for employers in NYC with 10 or fewer employees; $10.00 for Long Island & Westchester; $10.75 for fast food employees outside of NYC; $12.00 for fast food employees within NYC)
  • Ohio: $8.15 ($7.25 for employees at certain smaller companies, and for 14- and 15-year-olds; the wage rises to $4.08 for tipped employees)
  • Oregon: $10.25, beginning July 1, 2017 ($11.25 for employees working within the urban growth boundary of a metropolitan service district; $10.00 in nonurban counties)
  • Rhode Island: $3.89 for tipped employees (for non-tipped employees, the $9.60 minimum wagerate remains unchanged)
  • South Dakota: $8.65 ($4.325 for tipped employees)
  • Vermont: $10.00 ($5.00 for certain service or tipped employees)
  • Washington: $11.00

 

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