The minimum wage will go up in 23 states on Jan 1.  Here’s why New Mexico isn’t among them.
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The minimum wage will go up in 23 states on Jan 1. Here’s why New Mexico isn’t among them.

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The minimum wage will go up in 23 states on Jan 1. Here’s why New Mexico isn’t among them.

  Twenty two states and the District of Columbia are set to raise their minimum wage in 2017 (see below for the full list). As a state that leads the country in income i ...

 

Twenty two states and the District of Columbia are set to raise their minimum wage in 2017 (see below for the full list).

As a state that leads the country in income inequality between rich and poor, has one of the country’s lowest child welfare rankings and more than 90,000 children who depend on a minimum wage worker, you’d think New Mexico should be on the list of increasing wage states.  But it isn’t for an incredibly frustrating reason.

Even though more than 2/3 of New Mexicans support raising the state’s minimum wage of just $7.50 an hour, Republican leaders in the State House have consistently organized efforts kill those proposals. On the one occasion when a simple $1 increase passed the legislature in 2013, Governor Martinez vetoed it.

But, thanks to progressive wins in State Legislative races in 2016, Democrats see a new opportunity to raise the wage with a new Constitutional Amendment that doesn’t require the governor’s approval.

The minimum wage will rise in a number of states in 2017:

  • Alaska: $9.80
  • Arizona: $10.00
  • Arkansas: $8.50 for employers with 4 or more employees
  • California: $10.50 for employers with 26 or more employees (for smaller employers, the rate remains $10.00)
  • Colorado: $9.30 ($6.28 for tipped employees)
  • Connecticut: $10.10
  • District of Columbia: $12.50, beginning July 1, 2017 ($3.33 for tipped employees)
  • Florida: $8.10 ($5.08 for tipped employees)
  • Hawaii: $9.25
  • Maine: $9.00, beginning January 7, 2017
  • Maryland: $9.25, beginning July 1, 2017
  • Massachusetts: $11.00 ($3.75 for tipped employees)
  • Michigan: $8.90 ($3.38 for tipped employees)
  • Missouri: $7.70 ($3.85 for tipped employees)
  • Montana: $8.15
  • New Jersey: $8.44
  • New York: $9.70, beginning December 31, 2016 ($11.00 for employers in NYC with 11 or more employees; $10.50 for employers in NYC with 10 or fewer employees; $10.00 for Long Island & Westchester; $10.75 for fast food employees outside of NYC; $12.00 for fast food employees within NYC)
  • Ohio: $8.15 ($7.25 for employees at certain smaller companies, and for 14- and 15-year-olds; the wage rises to $4.08 for tipped employees)
  • Oregon: $10.25, beginning July 1, 2017 ($11.25 for employees working within the urban growth boundary of a metropolitan service district; $10.00 in nonurban counties)
  • Rhode Island: $3.89 for tipped employees (for non-tipped employees, the $9.60 minimum wagerate remains unchanged)
  • South Dakota: $8.65 ($4.325 for tipped employees)
  • Vermont: $10.00 ($5.00 for certain service or tipped employees)
  • Washington: $11.00