Senate: Gov didn’t disclose donor behind her request for $20+ million special state contract; “We’re being lied to” senator says

As the governor faces down a veto override led by members of her own party, a Republican State Senator unexpectedly began the process to recall a bill exempting a real estate contract from state purchasing laws. Senators said the governor’s administration did not disclose that the beneficiary was a major donor to Governor Martinez’s campaign and PAC nor that the space was deemed incompatible with the state’s needs by one of Martinez’s own cabinet secretaries. “I found out the information I was given early on was not accurate – that there were campaign contributions I wasn’t aware of,” Republican Senator Neville said in an interview with the Albuquerque Journal. “We’re being lied to,” Sen. Cisco McSorley, D-Albuquerque, said on the floor. “This is despicable.”

Andrew Oxford reported in the NM Political Report and Santa Fe New Mexican:
In an extraordinary maneuver, state senators killed a bill Saturday that they had approved four days earlier after one of them said he had misled his colleagues about connections between Republican Gov. Susana Martinez and real estate developers who stood to benefit from the legislation.

Thousands of petitions delivered to state legislators demanding background checks for gun sales

A few weeks ago, ProgressNow got word that the NRA was flooding New Mexico legislators’ inboxes with out of state emails – so we decided to fire back. And today, with help from the New Mexico chapter of Moms Demand Action, we handed in thousands of petitions signed by New Mexicans who support background checks for gun sales legislation. As the legislature winds to an end this upcoming Friday, work-days and work-weeks are getting longer, with hearings lasting into the night and on weekends. The House Judiciary Committee, the current place for gun violence prevention legislation, was set to meet today until a last minute change pushed the meeting to this upcoming Monday, 3/13, at 1:30. So…You guessed it!

Governor Martinez Vetoes Hemp

HB144 hit its only snag on Thursday, the Governor’s desk…
That’s right, Governor Martinez chose to veto a bill that received support from multiple committees, and cleared the floor of both the House and Senate.

[UPDATE:] Bill to decriminalize abortion in New Mexico PASSES in the HOUSE

[UPDATE:]House Bill #473 that decriminalizes abortion PASSES in the House. The bill now moves on to the Judiciary Committee. You’ve done it again! Thank you for turning out on a SUNDAY to show lawmakers you are invested in the health of New Mexico women! HB 220, the Late-term Abortion Ban was defeated, along with HB 221, the Forced Parental Notification Bill. These two Draconian bills have no place in a society that values the lives and healthcare of women – thank you for your support.

New Poll: 57% of New Mexicans disapprove of Gov. Martinez. Here’s why.

New polling by ProgressNowNM and Public Policy Polling show that a large majority of New Mexicans now disapprove of the job Susana Martinez is doing as governor — and an even larger number oppose Republican plans to oppose common-sense revenue enhancements to balance the budget. At the request of ProgressNowNM, Public Policy Polling (PPP) conducted a survey of 881 New Mexico voters (voted in 2016 elections) using a combination of live and online surveys from Thursday February 23 – Saturday February 26, 2017. Governor Martinez Job Approval

The governor maintains her historically low job approval ratings, with just 42% of New Mexicans believing she is doing a good or excellent job, while 57% disapprove (including 59% of self-identified Hispanic voters). While Martinez’s approval ratings continue to hover in this area (last pinned at 42% in 8/16 by an Albuquerque Journal poll), her disapproval ratings are significantly worse: down to 57% from 44% in the Journal’s August poll. Just 2% of voters statewide are unsure of their opinion of Martinez (down from 14% in August), a surprisingly low number and sign that undecided voters are overwhelmingly seeing Martinez negatively.

New Poll: 61% of NM voters oppose more corporate tax cuts (incl. a majority of Republicans). So why is Gov. Martinez against it?

New polling by ProgressNowNM and Public Policy Polling show that a large majority of New Mexicans now disapprove of the job Susana Martinez is doing as governor — and an even larger number oppose Republican plans to oppose common-sense revenue enhancements to balance the budget. At the request of ProgressNowNM, Public Policy Polling (PPP) conducted a survey of 881 New Mexico voters (voted in 2016 elections) using a combination of live and online surveys from Thursday February 23 – Saturday February 26, 2017. Specific Revenue Enhancements

The most popular revenue enhancement is an increase in the cigarette tax by $1.50 to $1.88 per pack. 82% of 2016 voters support this (71% strongly). 88% of Democrats, 78% of Republicans and 77% of independents support this proposal.  The strongest opposition came from just 14% of Republicans and 13% of independent voters.

New Poll: New Mexicans want legislature to tax wealthy, corps., cigarettes – not cut education, Medicaid or public safety

New polling by ProgressNowNM and Public Policy Polling show that a large majority of New Mexicans now disapprove of the job Susana Martinez is doing as governor — and an even larger number oppose Republican plans to oppose common-sense revenue enhancements to balance the budget. At the request of ProgressNowNM, Public Policy Polling (PPP) conducted a survey of 881 New Mexico voters (voted in 2016 elections) using a combination of live and online surveys from Thursday February 23 – Saturday February 26, 2017. Specific Proposals to Cut Budget Areas

63% of 2016 voters oppose cuts to Medicaid to balance the budget. Democrats most strongly hold this view (74% of Democrats oppose cuts) – but independent voters show a strong preference for opposing cuts: 65% oppose. 63% of 2016 voters oppose more cuts to public schools – with almost half of 2016 voters, 47%, strongly opposing this proposal (largest “strong oppose” number of any proposal tested).