12-Month Supply Contraception Bill Passes in the House

Another win for women: the Health Coverage for Contraception Bill (HB 284) sponsored by Rep. Debbie Armstrong is on its way to the Judiciary Committee. The aim of the measure is to update the state’s existing law to ensure that the full range of contraceptive options is covered by insurance companies without out-of-pocket costs or medically unnecessary restrictions. The bill will improve access to contraception by covering access for both women and men by making it possible for them to acquire a year’s worth of their contraception with one prescription. READ MORE about today’s hearing at the NM Political Report. There are several reproductive bills to watch during the 2017 New Mexico Legislative Session, follow the progress by clicking here.

State Republicans try to BAN ABORTION, again. RESIST!

[UPDATE:]
HB 37 has been SCHEDULED TO BE HEARD IN COMMITTEE ON THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 2017
We need to show our strength in numbers. We need your help. HB 37 or the Born Alive Bill aims to make the act of a late-term abortion a second-degree felony, no matter the circumstance, or whether or not the pregnancy endangers the mother. This bill has made the rounds before and has been voted down in committee, year after year. However, the Trump-Pence Administration is empowering more radical voices to assert dangerous policies like the Born Alive Bill, with new vigor. Their pro-life platform is far reaching and has already begun to reduce access to abortion with the ultimate goal to make all abortions illegal. Now HB 37 is back with five sponsors this year.

How your congressional delegates voted | ABQJournal Online

How your congressional delegates voted

Contact your legislators at the U.S. Capitol

Zip codes: House 20515, Senate 20510

Capitol operator: (202) 224-3121

ABORTION COVERAGE IN HEALTH LAW: Voting 227 for and 188 against, the House on Jan. 28 passed a Republican bill (HR 7) that would ban subsidized insurance policies that cover abortion from the Affordable Care Act’s state and federal marketplaces. The bill would prohibit any use of federal funds, including tax credits, to subsidize premiums for such policies. Critics call this an overreach because the ACA already requires policyholders to pay the premium share that applies to reproductive services. But backers said the “separate payment” requirement is being widely disregarded.