Veterans Might Have to Remember What Healthcare was like…

As Americans, we are guaranteed the opportunity to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness and those rights are bravely defended by those wearing the uniforms of our armed service. Some have given their all while serving in uniform and it’s their memory we honor this weekend. For those who come home from conflicts, the battle isn’t always left behind. On this Memorial Day, we are taking the time to put a lens on what recent decisions by the Trump administration mean for those who protect and serve our country. Another fight is upon us all as we experience the impact of sweeping decisions made by the current administration under the hand of President Donald Trump.

5 Big Ways Trump’s Government Shutdown Will Impact New Mexico on Day 1

President Donald Trump wants his 100th day in office to be memorable.  That milestone comes this weekend, but it might not be memorable for the reasons he wants. Funding for the Federal government ends on Friday and Trump is demanding that Congress pass a budget extension to fund two key campaign promises: building a border wall and billions in new military spending at the expense of state department and domestic programs.

If his big push goes anything like his Obamacare repeal, Trump won’t get his budget and that means Trump’s 100th day could be day 1 of a government shutdown. Top Trump officials push border wall as government shutdown looms https://t.co/YDMhPLBVPv pic.twitter.com/KLgACrZptG
— The Hill (@thehill) April 23, 2017

Earlier this month our own Gov. Martinez threw a fit and threatened a government shutdown if she didn’t get the budget bill she wanted. Now Trump is following suit, so we wanted to see what a shutdown would mean for New Mexicans.

Did Susana Martinez finally go too far? Legislators to challenge gov’s vetoes in court and in extraordinary session

Governor Martinez threw a fit last week and vetoed the entire legislative branch of government, higher education for every New Mexican student and job training seeker and revenues designed to protect classroom spending, Medicaid and public safety. Now legislators have had enough so they are fighting back.Leaders of the legislature, Speaker Brian Egolf (D-Santa Fe) and Sen. Maj. Leader Peter Wirth (D-Santa Fe), announced yesterday that the Legislative Council Service had been instructed by leaders to initiate legal action to challenge the governor’s vetoes in 3 key areas. Read more: Legislators to sue Martinez over vetoes | NM Political Report

Veto of co-equal branch of government to be challenged
Can a governor just veto all funding for the legislative branch?  Legislators say no and they’ve instructed their staff to use what little funding they have left in their current budget to hire a lawyer and sue the governor to find out.

Gov. Martinez vetoed the legislature’s entire budget in spiteful budget battle

After facing criticism for leaving more than 200 bills unsigned on her desk while leaving the state to speak at a conference of Tennessee workers, Martinez surprised nearly everyone by coming back to the state to announce hundreds-of-millions of dollars in vetoes, including vetoes to the entire budgets of every state college and university and the entire budget of the legislature, a branch she admits in her veto message is supposed to be a co-equal branch of government. The vetoed version of the budget includes line-item vetoes of the entire legislative budget.  

At $18.7 million, the budget for the entire branch of government amounts to just 0.03% of the state’s $6 billion budget. Gov. also vetoes legislator memberships, keeps $100,000 in memberships for her out-of-state conferences and travel
Martinez also vetoed memberships and funds for travel for state legislators to attend legislative events but she kept more than $100,000 for her own memberships to governor’s conferences she frequently attends of out state at taxpayer expense, including the National and Western States Governors Associations.  
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Wait, What? The Governor Vetoed College?

As a student, father, husband, son, current Master’s student, and former college professor and high school teacher, I sit at my keyboard and type this statement with tears in my eyes, and in a complete state of disbelief. Our Governor has chosen to balance the budget by cutting ALL funding to higher education in New Mexico. Yes, you read that right – now let it sink in a bit. Read more:

Gov. Martinez vetoed every college and university in New Mexico because the Senate won’t confirm her partisan nominee. As a college student in 2000, I worked at Albuquerque High School, as a mentor for the Enlace program.

New Poll: New Mexicans want legislature to tax wealthy, corps., cigarettes – not cut education, Medicaid or public safety

New polling by ProgressNowNM and Public Policy Polling show that a large majority of New Mexicans now disapprove of the job Susana Martinez is doing as governor — and an even larger number oppose Republican plans to oppose common-sense revenue enhancements to balance the budget. At the request of ProgressNowNM, Public Policy Polling (PPP) conducted a survey of 881 New Mexico voters (voted in 2016 elections) using a combination of live and online surveys from Thursday February 23 – Saturday February 26, 2017. Specific Proposals to Cut Budget Areas

63% of 2016 voters oppose cuts to Medicaid to balance the budget. Democrats most strongly hold this view (74% of Democrats oppose cuts) – but independent voters show a strong preference for opposing cuts: 65% oppose. 63% of 2016 voters oppose more cuts to public schools – with almost half of 2016 voters, 47%, strongly opposing this proposal (largest “strong oppose” number of any proposal tested).

New Report: Mo money for prisons means no money for schools

The U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service released a brief examining State and Local Expenditures on Corrections and Education in the last 33 years and the statistics are terrifying. Barbara Petersen, APS Board Member, notes “New Mexico is second only to Texas in the difference between the increase in prison spending to education spending, 668 percentage points difference in the increases in Texas, 602 percentage points difference in the increases in New Mexico.” “Over the last three decades, state and local corrections expenditures has increased three times faster than spending on elementary and secondary education” (p. 5). From 1979 to 2013, New Mexico:

state and local corrections current expenditures and public PK–12 current expenditures had a 602% difference in percent change (p.

Gov. OK’s $1 million in new gun ranges, axes detox/homeless shelter

Governor Martinez used her veto pen today to kill more than 150 already paid-for public projects across the state.  That’s a big headline on it’s own; but it’s even more relevant when we compare a few of the things she did, and didn’t, veto from the state budget. For the third time in four years, Governor Martinez vetoed critical state funding for the only detox and homeless shelter in the Gallup region. 25 people have died from alcohol-related exposure deaths there over the past two winters, KOB TV recently reported. Senators Udall and Heinrich stepped up to help find federal funding to fill the gap left by the governor’s veto last year. This year’s funding would have provided shelter and detox services into next winter, but this veto leaves funding uncertain for the many alcohol-dependent and homeless New Mexicans in the area where alcoholism and homelessness exceed the state and national average by several times.  A Democratic state legislator has inserted the appropriation, in different forms, for the past four years.