Martinez is 6th “least popular” gov in the country: What do the falling approval numbers actually mean?

This week, a national polling company released findings showing that Governor Susana Martinez, already the two-time recipient of “worst run state” award, is now also the 6th LEAST popular governor in the country. This after her approval rating has dropped a full ten points since the beginning of this year. As Martinez moves into the final year of her governorship, it’s really not hard to look back over the last seven years and find a litany of blunders, bad policy, and downright criminal behavior. Not to mention the infamous Pizza Party that brought worldwide attention, unfortunately, to Martinez and the state. But what is it about this year that has New Mexicans fully pulling their support from the two-term Republican even as her party has taken the highest seats in government?

The top 5 WORST things from #NMLEG 2016

It’s almost here; the final day of the 2016 legislature. As always, the battles inside the Roundhouse this year were hard fought. Sadly, though, the trend of New Mexico Republicans being completely and laughably out-of-touch with the needs of ordinary New Mexicans continued unabated this year. From new Secretary of State candidate Rep. Nora Espinoza trying to legalize discrimination and gut wages for construction workers, to male Republican lawmakers trying to insert the government into private decisions about women’s reproductive health, to a House committee chairman claiming that people in New Mexico don’t understand real poverty (!), Republican legislators proved again this year that they’re living in a different universe. But guess what?

If it bleeds it leads: Crime bills in the #NMLEG

 

What’s with the flood of crime bills this legislative session? If you’ve watched any TV news recently you’ve been buried under a barrage of “if it bleeds it leads” reporting. The drum beat about how “boomerang thugs” are wreaking havoc on New Mexico is a near constant thing. FACT: Violent crime actually decreased in New Mexico by 2% from 2009-2014. Excluding Albuquerque, violent crime was down 13%.