The 5 most important things you need to know about the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association’s political power play  

 

This is the fifth and final piece in a series of articles highlighting the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association. NMOGA lobbies on behalf of oil and gas interests, seeking less regulation and oversight for their industry and greater access to political power in the state. Last year, the Executive Director of NMOGA, Ryan Flynn, spoke at their annual meeting about the future of oil and gas in New Mexico as they moved into the election cycle of 2018, their goals to seize power, and the strength of their “opposition,” the citizens of New Mexico who have pushed back against the fossil fuel industry and their stranglehold on the state at all levels.  

Let’s recap what we have learned so far in looking more in-depth into NMOGA in the past month:

NMOGA’s Executive Director, Ryan Flynn, gave a speech last October to members of his association, the full transcript of which was leaked and full of some pretty concerning rhetoric. Besides proclaiming that his intention was to make NMOGA the “most powerful organization” in the state, Flynn also unabashedly pointed out his close personal ties with Governor Susana Martinez and touted that relationship as something positive for oil and gas companies.

[BREAKING] Pearce wrong on methane (again), endorses Trump plan to allow more taxpayer waste

Today, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke proposed gutting the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Methane Waste Prevention rule, which was designed to limit the wasteful venting and flaring of methane from oil and gas operations on public lands. And Congressman Steve Pearce was right there to applaud this giant step backward. 
In supporting efforts to rollback needed methane waste standards, Pearce is completely ignoring the fact that methane venting and flaring costs New Mexicans MILLIONS in lost revenue every year. New Mexico wastes more natural gas (primarily made up of methane) from it’s federal and tribal lands than any other state – $100 million worth of natural gas annually that should be generating millions more in royalty revenue for New Mexico schools. Pearce has a long history of supporting the extraction industry over the actual wishes of his own constituents. Whether it’s voting against the methane rule or opposing preserving public lands, Pearce has sided with extraction related industries at every turn. 
Secretary Zinke’s proposal would severely weaken efforts to curb waste on public lands, leading to the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars of taxpayer-owned energy every year.

Coming soon thanks to NMOGA, oil derricks and gas plants next door to NM schools?

This is the fourth in a series of articles highlighting the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association. NMOGA lobbies on behalf of oil and gas interests, seeking less regulation and oversight for their industry and greater access to political power in the state. Last year, the Executive Director of NMOGA, Ryan Flynn, spoke at their annual meeting about the future of oil and gas in New Mexico as they moved into the election cycle of 2018, their goals to seize power, and the strength of their “opposition,” the citizens of New Mexico who have pushed back against the fossil fuel industry and their stranglehold on the state at all levels.  
NMOGA’s Executive Director has made a lot of big claims about how his industry aims to help New Mexicans, especially pointing out the fiscal returns to schools from lease permits from oil and gas companies. But what kind of quality of life can families expect in New Mexico if methane, benzene, and other pollution is being vented right next door to a school or a day-care center? 
Today the New Mexico State The New Mexico Environment Department’s (NMED) Air Quality Bureau is meeting to decide the fate of proposed new rules governing how oil and gas companies are allowed to build new facilities within the state.

The dirty (not so) little secret about how much oil and gas “helps” our state

This is the third in a series of articles highlighting the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association. NMOGA lobbies on behalf of oil and gas interests, seeking less regulation and oversight for their industry and greater access to political power in the state. Last year, the Executive Director of NMOGA, Ryan Flynn, spoke at their annual meeting about the future of oil and gas in New Mexico as they moved into the election cycle of 2018, their goals to seize power, and the strength of their “opposition,” the citizens of New Mexico who have pushed back against the fossil fuel industry and their stranglehold on the state at all levels.  

In a report out last week, the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association made some pretty bold claims about how much their industry does for the state; funding schools and bolstering the state’s economy in general. But there’s a pretty serious cloud over those numbers, and quite literally, over the state in the form of the wasted methane, and lost revenue, from New Mexico’s oil and gas producers.

New Mexico Oil and Gas Association director on Trump’s shortlist to lead EPA

This is the second in a series of articles highlighting the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association. NMOGA lobbies on behalf of oil and gas interests, seeking less regulation and oversight for their industry and greater access to political power in the state. Last year, the Executive Director of NMOGA, Ryan Flynn, spoke at their annual meeting about the future of oil and gas in New Mexico as they moved into the election cycle of 2018, their goals to seize power, and the strength of their “opposition,” the citizens of New Mexico who have pushed back against the fossil fuel industry and their stranglehold on the state at all levels.   

As Executive Director of the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association, Ryan Flynn is making good on his promise to his organization to become “the most powerful organization in the state of New Mexico, period.” Last week there were multiple reports from around the state that as a whole, the oil and gas industry far exceeded any other industry in their lobbying dollars and campaign spending. And while money isn’t always power, it’s difficult to ignore the absurd levels of spending from Flynn’s Oil and Gas Association members.

New Mexico Oil and Gas Association speech LEAKED: You won’t believe what they said

“NMOGA is going to be the most powerful organization in the state of New Mexico, period.”

– Ryan Flynn, Executive Director New Mexico Oil and Gas Association

 

 

This is the beginning of a series of articles highlighting the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association. NMOGA lobbies on behalf of oil and gas interests, seeking less regulation and oversight for their industry and greater access to political power in the state. Last year, the Executive Director of NMOGA, Ryan Flynn, spoke at their annual meeting about the future of oil and gas in New Mexico as they moved into the election cycle of 2018, their goals to seize power, and the strength of their “opposition,” the citizens of New Mexico who have pushed back against the fossil fuel industry and their stranglehold on the state at all levels.  

Every fall, members of the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association meet in Santa Fe for their annual member meeting; a meeting so large that two years ago there weren’t enough hotel rooms in the city to accommodate legislators who had to return to the Roundhouse for a special session. At the most recent convention in October of 2017, the NMOGA Executive Director Ryan Flynn gave his keynote address to his members, highlighting the return of higher per-barrel oil on a worldwide level, the increased growth of wells and production in New Mexico, and towing the line that their work was critical to the success of the state. About halfway through his half-hour remarks, Flynn gave a nod to his former boss and her role in the Oil and Gas Industry’s continued success in New Mexico.

[BREAKING] NM’s Attorney General challenges Trump methane rollbacks in court

New Mexico’s Attorney General Hector Balderas joined California’s Attorney General Xavier Becerra in taking the Trump administration to court to challenge rollbacks in methane emissions standards. The legal action charges that the move from Trump’s Department of the Interior violates a host of existing regulations and protocols designed to update industry standards that otherwise have operated under decade-old rules. Oil and gas companies vent or flare a significant amount of methane gas during their operations that, besides having negative effects on the environment and New Mexican’s health, wastes a significant amount of a product that otherwise could be utilized to fuel New Mexico homes and other services. The move comes as new polling data in New Mexico shows overwhelming support from a broad swath of the general public for common sense measures designed to limit methane emissions from the oil and gas industry. A new poll conducted by The Majority Institute released this week shows that New Mexicans across the state support strengthening the state’s rules on limiting methane pollution that is leaked, vented or flared from oil and gas facilities.

[TAKE ACTION] We thought we had won. But the stream access issue is back and the people of New Mexico need to speak up

The New Mexico Game and Fish Commission has just called a last-minute emergency meeting to try to push through a new rule limiting New Mexicans access to our public streams and rivers. The proposed rule would infringe upon the constitutional rights of New Mexico citizens and tourists to utilize publicly accessible streams and their streambeds, including those flowing through or adjacent to private property, for fishing, boating, or other recreational purposes. The rule also holds out a false promise to landowners, who would be required to undergo an arduous process to have a stream certified as non-navigable and subject to the new rule and trespass statute. We wrote about this about a month ago so if you’d like to learn more, go check out that article here. And all of this is happening while the New Mexico Constitution and the New Mexico Supreme Court have already made this abundantly clear: the state’s waters are for all New Mexico citizens, not just the wealthy few.

[Take Action] Stream access rights have deeper implications for all New Mexicans

As an engaged citizenry, we are accustomed to fighting for the rights we deserve. Part of that, unfortunately, is fighting for rights that were taken away, often hastily and discretely, often related to protecting the interests of campaign donors. So is the case with stream access in New Mexico – a right that was guaranteed by water law when New Mexico was still a territory, reiterated in our state constitution in 1911, backed by a 1945 Supreme Court opinion, and upheld again in 2014 by another opinion by then-Attorney General Gary King. Last year ProgressNow NM’s Education Fund helped bring attention to this issue through a series of commercials and with YOUR help. More than 100 years of state history was quickly unwound in 2015, when Senate Bill 226 passed the Senate by a wide margin in the early afternoon of the next-to-last day of the 60-day session, then passed the House on a party-line vote that evening, and signed into law by the governor a few days later.