It’s time for a change in New Mexico’s House District 41

Debbie Rodella has been the representative for House District 41 since 1993. After all that time, she’s barely faced any opposition from members of her own party, last facing a primary challenge in 2006. But after a series of votes over the last few years, it has become clear to many that it’s time for a change in the district. Rodella has taken nearly $20,000 from the payday lending industry in the last decade and made sure that at least three times bills designed to protect New Mexicans died in the committee she chairs. As a whole, that industry has spent almost A MILLION DOLLARS in the last few years to oppose common-sense consumer protections. Such protections would ensure that predatory practices from these high-interest lenders would at least have some checks and balances, as well as legal protections for consumers.

[TAKE ACTION] Rep. Carl Trujillo needs to resign

We believe Laura Bonar. It is deeply courageous for a woman to speak publicly about being sexually harassed or assaulted. 
ProgressNow New Mexico is standing with Laura as we have stood with other women in the last year speaking out against their harassers. We are joining her and others in calling for Rep. Carl Trujillo’s resignation. 
Laura wants what all women want – for women to be safe in their workplace and for elected leaders to be ethical and to be held accountable. Instead, Trujillo responded the same way others have responded – as if he is the victim. We’ve seen this response before–the cowardice in Representative  Trujillo’s response.

For Dems, Lt. Governor race is still a toss-up, but GOP and Libs are locked in

ProgressNow New Mexico will be looking at some top-level races more in-depth over the next few weeks to bring our perspective to the key races we’re expecting to see in New Mexico this year. New Mexico is in the national spotlight as one of the “most likely to flip” states in terms of our governor’s race. Our series will focus on the offices that New Mexicans can vote for statewide. This is the third piece in our series. The position of Lt. Governor can seem pretty inglorious compared to other statewide positions with specific duties as Secretary of State or Attorney General.

Legislative round up 2018- Here’s all the people who worked against women and access to healthcare this year

This year’s 30-day session saw a litany of conservative attempts to once again limit women’s reproductive options in New Mexico by pushing for laws that interfere with personal reproductive health care decisions and that reinforce shame and stigma. Thankfully the progressive majority in both the House and Senate held such arcane bills at bay in committees, keeping reproductive choice in the hands of families who are the sole deciders of their health decisions. In this election year, it’s important that we remain focused on who these obstructionist legislators are so that voters can help move New Mexico forward in assuring women and families have access to whatever healthcare options are right for them, up to and including abortion. Every Representative above voted to restrict access to abortion in some form this year, and in years past. That includes Democratic Representatives Debbie Rodella and Carl Trujillo. 
Some “highlights” of the session include when Minority Leader Nate Gentry attempted to politicize a visit from Albuquerque Police Officer Ryan Holets.

#5 – Top 5 Martinez blunders as we approach another legislative session

As the new year starts to pick up speed, as our 30-day legislative session creeps ever closer, we thought it’s the perfect time to highlight some of the failures of our state’s commander-in-chief, Governor Susana Martinez. Between now and the first day of session, when Governor Martinez is set to give her last State of the State Address, Progress Now NM is pleased to present the top five times Governor Martinez has failed the people of New Mexico.

[TAKE ACTION] We thought we had won. But the stream access issue is back and the people of New Mexico need to speak up

The New Mexico Game and Fish Commission has just called a last-minute emergency meeting to try to push through a new rule limiting New Mexicans access to our public streams and rivers. The proposed rule would infringe upon the constitutional rights of New Mexico citizens and tourists to utilize publicly accessible streams and their streambeds, including those flowing through or adjacent to private property, for fishing, boating, or other recreational purposes. The rule also holds out a false promise to landowners, who would be required to undergo an arduous process to have a stream certified as non-navigable and subject to the new rule and trespass statute. We wrote about this about a month ago so if you’d like to learn more, go check out that article here. And all of this is happening while the New Mexico Constitution and the New Mexico Supreme Court have already made this abundantly clear: the state’s waters are for all New Mexico citizens, not just the wealthy few.

“Preemption” – Progressive wins in New Mexico cities may be at risk at the state level

The Las Cruces City Council seated its new and re-elected members today and, in a flourish of newly proposed business, showed what a dedicated panel of progressive leaders can accomplish when working together. In their first session, the newly seated council saw returning Progressive Champion Gill Sorg be elected unanimously as the new Mayor pro-tem, signaling a shift away from registered Independent Greg Smith who’s held the post for the last two years. Sorg also went on to introduce proposals that the council take up a resolution in support of the Legislature legalizing recreational cannabis as well as a measure to bolster support for immigrants living in Las Cruces. Major cities in New Mexico are “home rule cities” which allow citizens to directly shape their cities in important ways — the most prominent being the use of citizen-led ballot initiatives. This rule has been an extremely important tool for progressive voters to move New Mexico forward.

[Take Action] Stream access rights have deeper implications for all New Mexicans

As an engaged citizenry, we are accustomed to fighting for the rights we deserve. Part of that, unfortunately, is fighting for rights that were taken away, often hastily and discretely, often related to protecting the interests of campaign donors. So is the case with stream access in New Mexico – a right that was guaranteed by water law when New Mexico was still a territory, reiterated in our state constitution in 1911, backed by a 1945 Supreme Court opinion, and upheld again in 2014 by another opinion by then-Attorney General Gary King. Last year ProgressNow NM’s Education Fund helped bring attention to this issue through a series of commercials and with YOUR help. More than 100 years of state history was quickly unwound in 2015, when Senate Bill 226 passed the Senate by a wide margin in the early afternoon of the next-to-last day of the 60-day session, then passed the House on a party-line vote that evening, and signed into law by the governor a few days later.

[BREAKING] Gov. Martinez’ bad week keeps getting worse: vetoed bills on hemp, internet, and STEM classes now law

After being accused of stealing a hamburger from a Santa Fe eatery earlier this week, Governor Susana Martinez just received even more bad news. The ten bills she vetoed without cause earlier this year just formally became law. This is great news for the citizens of New Mexico. Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver released the following statement today, addressing her formal “chaptering” of these new laws effective immediately. 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE September 28, 2017

Toulouse Oliver Chapters 10 Bills Improperly Vetoed During 2017 Legislative Session

SANTA FE – Earlier today, Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver was notified that District Court Judge Sarah Singleton has denied Governor Susana Martinez’s request to stay pending appeal the chaptering of ten bills that the Governor improperly vetoed during the 2017 legislative session. Upon receiving the ten bills from the House and Senate Clerks this morning, Secretary of State Toulouse Oliver has chaptered all ten bills. “As ordered by the Court, my office has swiftly chaptered all ten of the bills that the Court determined were improperly vetoed during the 2017 legislative session,” said Secretary of State Toulouse Oliver.